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Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
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Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
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There are 43 total results for your 4 noble truths search.

If shown, 2nd row of characters is Simplified Chinese.

Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

鹿

see styles
Mandarin/ lu4
Taiwan lu
Japanese shika(p);kasegi(ok);ka(ok);roku(ok);shika / しか(P);かせぎ(ok);か(ok);ろく(ok);シカ
Chinese deer
Japanese deer (esp. the sika deer, Cervus nippon); (personal name) Roku; (surname) Shikazaki; (surname) Shika; (personal name) Ka
mṛga; a deer; as Śākyamuni first preached the four noble truths in the Deer-garden, the deer is a symbol of his preaching.

四諦


四谛

see styles
Mandarin sì dì / si4 di4
Taiwan ssu ti
Japanese shitai / したい
Chinese the Four Noble Truths (Budd.), covered by the acronym 苦集滅道: all life is suffering 苦, the cause of suffering is desire 集, emancipation comes only by eliminating passions 滅|灭, the way 道 to emancipation is the Eight-fold Noble Way 八正道
Japanese {Buddh} (See 苦集滅道) The Four Noble Truths (of Buddhism)
catvāri-ārya-satyāni; 四聖諦; 四眞諦. The four dogmas, or noble truths, the primary and fundamental doctrines of Śākyamuni, said to approximate to the form of medical diagnosis. They are pain or 'suffering, its cause, its ending, the way thereto; that existence is suffering, that human passion (taṇhā, 欲 desire) is the cause of continued suffering, that by the destruction of human passion existence may be brought to an end; that by a life of holiness the destruction of human passion may be attained'. Childers. The four are 苦, 聚 (or 集), 滅, and 道諦, i. e. duḥkha 豆佉, samudaya 三牟提耶, nirodha 尼棲陀, and mārga 末加. Eitel interprets them (1) 'that 'misery' is a necessary attribute of sentient existence'; (2) that 'the 'accumulation' of misery is caused by the passions'; (3) that 'the 'extinction' of passion is possible; (4) mārga is 'the doctrine of the 'path' that leads to the extinction of passion'. (1) 苦 suffering is the lot of the 六趣 six states of existence; (2) 集 is the aggregation (or exacerbation) of suffering by reason of the passions; (3) 滅 is nirvana, the extinction of desire and its consequences, and the leaving of the sufferings of mortality as void and extinct; (4) 道 is the way of such extinction, i. e. the 八正道 eightfold correct way. The first two are considered to be related to this life, the last two to 出世間 a life outside or apart from the world. The four are described as the fundamental doctrines first preached to his five former ascetic companions. Those who accepted these truths were in the stage of śrāvaka. There is much dispute as to the meaning of 滅 'extinction' as to whether it means extinction of suffering, of passion, or of existence. The Nirvana Sutra 18 says that whoever accepts the four dogmas will put an end to births and deaths 若能見四諦則得斷生死 which does not of necessity mean the termination of existence but that of continued transmigration. v. 滅.

正見


正见

see styles
Mandarin zhèng jiàn / zheng4 jian4
Taiwan cheng chien
Japanese shouken / shoken / しょうけん
Japanese {Buddh} (See 八正道) right view; (female given name) Masami; (surname) Shoumi; (surname, given name) Shouken
samyag-dṛṣṭi, right views, understanding the four noble truths; the first of the 八正道; 'knowledge of the four noble truths. ' Keith.


see styles
Mandarin/ di4
Taiwan ti
Japanese tai / たい    akira / あきら
Chinese to examine; truth (Buddhism)
Japanese (given name) Tai; (given name) Akira
To judge, examine into, investigate, used in Buddhism for satya, a truth, a dogma, an axiom; applied to the āryasatyāni, the four dogmas, or noble truths, of 苦, 集, 滅, and 道 suffering, (the cause of its) assembly, the ( possibility of its cure, or) extinction, and the way (to extinction), i.e. the eightfold noble path, v. 四諦 and 八聖道. There are other categories of 諦, e.g. (2) 眞 and 俗 Reality in contrast with ordinary ideas of things; (3) 空, 假 and 中 q.v. (6) by the 勝論宗; and(8) by the 法相宗.; Two forms of statement: (a) 俗諦 saṃvṛti-satya, also called 世諦, 世俗諦, 覆俗諦, 覆諦, meaning common or ordinary statement, as if phenomena were real; (b) 眞諦 paramartha-satya, also called 第一諦, 勝義諦, meaning the correct dogma or averment of the enlightened. Another definition is 王法 and 佛法, royal law and Buddha law.

五乘

see styles
Mandarin wǔ chéng / wu3 cheng2
Taiwan wu ch`eng / wu cheng
Japanese gojō
The five vehicles conveying to the karma reward which differs according to the vehicle: they are generally summed up as (1) 入乘 rebirth among men conveyed by observing the five commandments; (2) 天乘 among the devas by the ten forms of good action; (3) 聲聞乘 among the śrāvakas by the four noble truths; (4) 緣覺乘 among pratyekabuddhas by the twelve nidānas; (5) 菩薩乘 among the Buddhas and bodhisattvas by the six pāramitās 六度 q. v. Another division is the various vehicles of bodhisattvas; pratyekabuddhas; śrāvakas; general; and devas-and-men. Another is Hīnayāna Buddha, pratyekabuddhas, śrāvakas, the gods of the Brahma heavens, and those of the desire-realm. Another is Hīnayāna ordinary disciples: śrāvakas: pratyekabuddhas; bodhisattvas; and the one all-inclusive vehicle. And a sixth, of Tiantai, is for men; devas; śrāvakas-cum-pratyekabuddhas; bodhisattvas: and the Buddha-vehicle. The esoteric cult has: men, corresponding with earth; devas, with water: śrāvakas, with fire: pratyekabuddhas, with wind; and bodhisattvas, with 空 the 'void'.

五時


五时

see styles
Mandarin wǔ shí / wu3 shi2
Taiwan wu shih
Japanese goji
(五時教) The five periods or divisions of Śākyamuni's teaching. According to Tiantai they are (1) 華嚴時 the Avataṃsaka or first period in three divisions each of seven days, after his enlightenment, when he preached the content, of this sutra; (2) 鹿苑時 the twelve years of his preaching the Āgamas 阿含 in the Deer Park; (3) 方等時 the eight years of preaching Mahāyāna-cum-Hīnayāna doctrines, the vaipulya period; (4) 般若時 the twenty-two years of his preaching the prajñā or wisdom sutras; (5) 法華涅槃時 the eight years of his preaching the Lotus Sutra and, in a day and a night, the Nirvana Sutra. According to the Nirvana School (now part of the Tiantai) they are (1) 三乘別教 the period when the differentiated teaching began and the distinction of the three vehicles, as represented by the 四諦 Four Noble Truths for śrāvakas, the 十二因緣 Twelve Nidānas for pratyekabuddhas, and the 六度 Six Pāramitās for bodhisattvas; (2) 三乘通教 the teaching common to all three vehicles, as seen in the 般若經; (3) 抑揚教 the teaching of the 維摩經, the 思益梵天所問經, and other sutras olling the bodhisattva teaching at the expense of that for śrāvakas; (4) 同歸教 the common objective teaching calling all three vehicles, through the Lotus, to union in the one vehicle; (5) 常住教 the teaehmg of eternal life i. e. the revelation through the Nirvana sutra of the eternity of Buddhahood; these five are also called 有相; 無相; 抑揚; 曾三歸—; and 圓常. According to 劉虬 Liu Chiu of the 晉 Chin dynasty, the teaching is divided into 頓 immediate and 漸 gradual attainment, the latter having five divisions called 五時教 similar to those of the Tiantai group. According to 法寶 Fabao of the Tang dynasty the five are (1) 小乘; (2) 般着 or 大乘; (3) 深密 or 三乘; (4) 法華 or 一乘; (5) 涅槃 or 佛性教.

五諦


五谛

see styles
Mandarin wǔ dì / wu3 di4
Taiwan wu ti
Japanese gotai
The five axioms: (1) 因諦 the cause, which is described as 集諦 of the Four Noble Truths; (2) 果諦 the effect as 苦諦; (3) 智諦 or 能知諦 diagnosis as 道諦; (4) 境諦 or 所知諦 the end or cure as 滅諦; to these add (5) 勝諦 or 至諦, the supreme axiom, i. e. the 眞如; v. 四諦; five truths

八諦


八谛

see styles
Mandarin bā dì / ba1 di4
Taiwan pa ti
Japanese hachitai
The eight truths, postulates, or judgments of the 法相 Dharmalakṣana school, i.e. four common or mundane, and four of higher meaning. The first four are (1) common postulates on reality, considering the nominal as real, e.g. a pot; (2) common doctrinal postulates, e.g. the five skandhas; (3) abstract postulates, e.g. the four noble truths 四諦; and (4) temporal postulates in regard to the spiritual in the material. The second abstract or philosophical four are (5) postulates on constitution and function, e.g. of the skandhas; (6) on cause and effect, e.g. the 四諦; (7) on the void, the immaterial, or reality; and (8) on the pure inexpressible ultimate or absolute; eight noble truths

十地

see styles
Mandarin shí de / shi2 de
Taiwan shih te
Japanese juuji / juji / じゅうじ
Japanese {Buddh} dasabhumi (forty-first to fiftieth stages in the development of a bodhisattva); (place-name) Juuji
daśabhūmi; v. 十住. The "ten stages" in the fifty-two sections of the development of a bodhisattva into a Buddha. After completing the十四向 he proceeds to the 十地. There are several groups. I. The ten stages common to the Three Vehicles 三乘 are: (1) 乾慧地 dry wisdom stage, i. e. unfertilized by Buddha-truth, worldly wisdom; (2) 性地 the embryo-stage of the nature of Buddha-truth, the 四善根; (3) 八人地 (八忍地), the stage of the eight patient endurances; (4) 見地 of freedom from wrong views; (5) 薄地 of freedom from the first six of the nine delusions in practice; (6) 離欲地 of freedom from the remaining three; (7) 巳辨地 complete discrimination in regard to wrong views and thoughts, the stage of an arhat; (8) 辟支佛地 pratyeka-buddhahood, only the dead ashes of the past left to sift; (9) 菩薩地 bodhisattvahood; (10) 佛地 Buddhahood. v. 智度論 78. II. 大乘菩薩十地 The ten stages of Mahāyāna bodhisattva development are: (1) 歡喜地 Pramuditā, joy at having overcome the former difficulties and now entering on the path to Buddhahood; (2) 離垢地 Vimalā, freedom from all possible defilement, the stage of purity; (3) 發光地 Prabhākarī, stage of further enlightenment; (4) 焰慧地 Arciṣmatī, of glowing wisdom; (5) 極難勝地 Sudurjayā, mastery of utmost or final difficulties; (6) 現前地 Abhimukhī, the open way of wisdom above definitions of impurity and purity; (7) 遠行地 Dūraṁgamā, proceeding afar, getting above ideas of self in order to save others; (8) 不動地 Acalā, attainment of calm unperturbedness; (9) 善慧地 Sādhumatī, of the finest discriminatory wisdom, knowing where and how to save, and possessed of the 十力 ten powers; (10) 法雲地 Dharmamegha, attaining to the fertilizing powers of the law-cloud. Each of the ten stages is connected with each of the ten pāramitās, v. 波. Each of the 四乘 or four vehicles has a division of ten. III. The 聲聞乘十地 ten Śrāvaka stages are: (1) 受三歸地 initiation as a disciple by receiving the three refuges, in the Buddha, Dharma, and Saṅgha; (2) 信地 belief, or the faith-root; (3) 信法地 belief in the four truths; (4) 内凡夫地 ordinary disciples who observe the 五停心觀, etc.; (5) 學信戒 those who pursue the 三學 three studies; (6) 八人忍地 the stage of 見道 seeing the true Way; (7) 須陀洹地 śrota-āpanna, now definitely in the stream and assured of nirvāṇa; (8) 斯陀含地 sakrdāgāmin, only one more rebirth; (9) 阿那含地 anāgāmin, no rebirth; and (10) 阿羅漢地 arhatship. IV. The ten stages of the pratyekabuddha 緣覺乘十地 are (1) perfect asceticism; (2) mastery of the twelve links of causation; (3) of the four noble truths; (4) of the deeper knowledge; (5) of the eightfold noble path; (6) of the three realms 三法界; (7) of the nirvāṇa state; (8) of the six supernatural powers; (9) arrival at the intuitive stage; (10) mastery of the remaining influence of former habits. V. 佛乘十地 The ten stages, or characteristics of a Buddha, are those of the sovereign or perfect attainment of wisdom, exposition, discrimination, māra-subjugation, suppression of evil, the six transcendent faculties, manifestation of all bodhisattva enlightenment, powers of prediction, of adaptability, of powers to reveal the bodhisattva Truth. VI. The Shingon has its own elaborate ten stages, and also a group 十地十心, see 十心; and there are other groups.

四眞

see styles
Mandarin sì zhēn / si4 zhen1
Taiwan ssu chen
Japanese shishin
(四眞諦) The four noble truths, v. 四諦 (四聖諦) , i. e. 苦, 集, 滅, 道 pain, its location, its cessation, the way of cure.

小乘

see styles
Mandarin xiǎo chéng / xiao3 cheng2
Taiwan hsiao ch`eng / hsiao cheng
Japanese shōjō
Chinese Hinayana, the Lesser Vehicle; Buddhism in India before the Mayahana sutras; also pr. [Xiao3 cheng2]
Hīnayāna 希那衍. The small, or inferior wain, or vehicle; the form of Buddhism which developed after Śākyamuni's death to about the beginning of the Christian era, when Mahāyāna doctrines were introduced. It is the orthodox school and more in direct line with the Buddhist succession than Mahāyānism which developed on lines fundamentally different. The Buddha was a spiritual doctor, less interested in philosophy than in the remedy for human misery and perpetual transmigration. He "turned aside from idle metaphysical speculations; if he held views on such topics, he deemed them valueless for the purposes of salvation, which was his goal" (Keith). Metaphysical speculations arose after his death, and naturally developed into a variety of Hīnayāna schools before and after the separation of a distinct school of Mahāyāna. Hīnayāna remains the form in Ceylon, Burma, and Siam, hence is known as Southern Buddhism in contrast with Northern Buddhism or Mahāyāna, the form chiefly prevalent from Nepal to Japan. Another rough division is that of Pali and Sanskrit, Pali being the general literary language of the surviving form of Hīnayāna, Sanskrit of Mahāyāna. The term Hīnayāna is of Mahāyānist origination to emphasize the universalism and altruism of Mahāyāna over the narrower personal salvation of its rival. According to Mahāyāna teaching its own aim is universal Buddhahood, which means the utmost development of wisdom and the perfect transformation of all the living in the future state; it declares that Hīnayāna, aiming at arhatship and pratyekabuddhahood, seeks the destruction of body and mind and extinction in nirvāṇa. For arhatship the 四諦Four Noble Truths are the foundation teaching, for pratyekabuddhahood the 十二因緣 twelve-nidānas, and these two are therefore sometimes styled the two vehicles 二乘. Tiantai sometimes calls them the (Hīnayāna) Tripiṭaka school. Three of the eighteen Hīnayāna schools were transported to China: 倶舍 (Abhidharma) Kośa; 成實 Satya-siddhi; and the school of Harivarman, the律 Vinaya school. These are described by Mahāyānists as the Buddha's adaptable way of meeting the questions and capacity of his hearers, though his own mind is spoken of as always being in the absolute Mahāyāna all-embracing realm. Such is the Mahāyāna view of Hīnayāna, and if the Vaipulya sūtras and special scriptures of their school, which are repudiated by Hīnayāna, are apocryphal, of which there seems no doubt, then Mahāyāna in condemning Hīnayāna must find other support for its claim to orthodoxy. The sūtras on which it chiefly relies, as regards the Buddha, have no authenticity; while those of Hīnayāna cannot be accepted as his veritable teaching in the absence of fundamental research. Hīnayāna is said to have first been divided into minority and majority sections immediately after the death of Śākyamuni, when the sthāvira, or older disciples, remained in what is spoken of as "the cave", some place at Rājagṛha, to settle the future of the order, and the general body of disciples remained outside; these two are the first 上坐部 and 大衆部 q. v. The first doctrinal division is reported to have taken place under the leadership of the monk 大天 Mahādeva (q.v.) a hundred years after the Buddha's nirvāṇa and during the reign of Aśoka; his reign, however, has been placed later than this by historians. Mahādeva's sect became the Mahāsāṅghikā, the other the Sthāvira. In time the two are said to have divided into eighteen, which with the two originals are the so-called "twenty sects" of Hīnayāna. Another division of four sects, referred to by Yijing, is that of the 大衆部 (Arya) Mahāsaṅghanikāya, 上座部 Āryasthavirāḥ, 根本說一切有部 Mūlasarvāstivādaḥ, and 正量部 Saṃmatīyāḥ. There is still another division of five sects, 五部律. For the eighteen Hīnayāna sects see 小乘十八部.

教理

see styles
Mandarin jiào lǐ / jiao4 li3
Taiwan chiao li
Japanese kyouri / kyori / きょうり
Chinese doctrine (religion)
Japanese doctrine
The fundamental principles of a religion; its doctrines, or dogmas, e.g. the four truths, the tweIve nidānas, the eightfold noble path.

緣諦


缘谛

see styles
Mandarin yuán dì / yuan2 di4
Taiwan yüan ti
Japanese entai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

聖諦


圣谛

see styles
Mandarin shèng dì / sheng4 di4
Taiwan sheng ti
Japanese shōtai
The sacred principles or dogmas, or those of the saints, or sages; especially the four noble truths, cf. 四聖諦.

豆佉

see styles
Mandarin dòu qū / dou4 qu1
Taiwan tou ch`ü / tou chü
Japanese zukya
Chinese dukkha (Sanskrit); suffering (Buddhism)
duḥkha, trouble, suffering, pain, defined by 逼惱 harassed, distressed. The first of the four dogmas, or 'Noble Truths' 四諦 is that all life is involved, through impermanence, in distress. There are many kinds of 苦 q. v.

集滅


集灭

see styles
Mandarin jí miè / ji2 mie4
Taiwan chi mieh
Japanese shūmetsu
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

作四諦


作四谛

see styles
Mandarin zuò sì dì / zuo4 si4 di4
Taiwan tso ssu ti
Japanese sa shitai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

具知根

see styles
Mandarin jù zhī gēn / ju4 zhi1 gen1
Taiwan chü chih ken
Japanese guchi kon
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

初時教


初时教

see styles
Mandarin chū shí jiào / chu1 shi2 jiao4
Taiwan ch`u shih chiao / chu shih chiao
Japanese shojikyō
A term of the 法相宗 Dharmalakṣana school, the first of the three periods of the Buddha's teaching, in which he overcame the ideas of heterodox teachers that the ego is real, and preached the four noble truths and the five skandhas, etc; first teaching period

四眞諦


四眞谛

see styles
Mandarin sì zhēn dì / si4 zhen1 di4
Taiwan ssu chen ti
Japanese shi shintai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

四眞道

see styles
Mandarin sì zhēn dào / si4 zhen1 dao4
Taiwan ssu chen tao
Japanese shi shindō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

四聖諦


四圣谛

see styles
Mandarin sì shèng dì / si4 sheng4 di4
Taiwan ssu sheng ti
Japanese shi shōtai
Chinese the Four Noble Truths (Buddhism); see also 四諦|四谛[si4 di4] and 苦集滅道|苦集灭道[ku3 ji2 mie4 dao4]
The four holy or noble truths, idem 四諦; four noble truths

四諦經


四谛经

see styles
Mandarin sì dì jīng / si4 di4 jing1
Taiwan ssu ti ching
Japanese Shitai kyō
The sutra of the four dogmas, tr. by 安世高 An Shih Kao, one juan. 四趣 Durgati; the four evil directions or destinations: the hells, hungry ghosts, animals, asuras; v. 四惡; Sūtra on the Four Noble Truths

已知根

see styles
Mandarin yǐ zhī gēn / yi3 zhi1 gen1
Taiwan i chih ken
Japanese ichi kon
ājñendriya. The second of the 三無漏根 q. v. One who already knows the indriya or roots that arise from the practical stage associated with the Four Dogmas, i. e. purpose, joy, pleasure, renunciation, faith, zeal, memory, abstract meditation, wisdom; faculty of the power of having learned (the Four Noble Truths)

滅道畏


灭道畏

see styles
Mandarin miè dào wèi / mie4 dao4 wei4
Taiwan mieh tao wei
Japanese metsudōi
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

見諦者


见谛者

see styles
Mandarin jiàn dì zhě / jian4 di4 zhe3
Taiwan chien ti che
Japanese kentia sha
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

諦現觀


谛现观

see styles
Mandarin dì xiàn guān / di4 xian4 guan1
Taiwan ti hsien kuan
Japanese tai genkan
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

二十二根

see styles
Mandarin èr shí èr gēn / er4 shi2 er4 gen1
Taiwan erh shih erh ken
Japanese nijūni kon
The twenty-two roots, organs, or powers, v. 根. They are: (1) 眼根 eye, cakṣurindriya; (2) 耳 根 ear, śrotrendriya; (3) 鼻根 nose, ghrāṇendriya; (4) 舌根 tongue, jihvendriya; (5) 身根 body, kāyendriya; (6) 意根 mind, manaīndriya (the above are the 六根); (7) 女根 female organ, strīndriya; (8) 男根 male organ, puruṣendriya; (9) 命根 life, jīvitendriya; (10) 苦根 suffering (or pain), duḥkhendriya; (11) 樂根 pleasure, sukhendriya; (12) 憂根 sorrow, daurmanasyendriya; (13) 喜根 joy, saumanas-yendriya; (14) 捨根 abandoning, upekṣendriya (from 10 to 14 they are the 五受); (15) 信根 faith, śraddhendriya; (16) 精進根 zeal, vīryendriya; (17) 念根 memory, smṛtīndriya; (18) 定根 meditation, or trance, samādhīndriya; (19) 慧根 wisdom, prajñendriya (these are the 信等之五根); (20) 未知當知根 the power for learning (the Four Noble Truths) anājñātamājñāsyāmīndriya; (21) 巳知根 the power of having learned (them), ājñendriya; (22) 具知根 the power of perfect knowledge (of them), ājñātādvīndriya (these three are called the 無漏根) ; twenty-two faculties

二種因果


二种因果

see styles
Mandarin èr zhǒng / er4 zhong3
Taiwan erh chung
Japanese nishuinka
Two aspects of cause and effect, a division of the 四諦 "four noble truths" (a) 世間因果 in the present life, the 苦諦 being the effect, and the 集諦 the cause; (b) 出世間因果 in the future life, the 滅諦, extinction (of passion, or mortality) being the fruit, and the 道諦 the " eightfold noble path " the cause.

十六行相

see styles
Mandarin shí liù xíng xiàng / shi2 liu4 xing2 xiang4
Taiwan shih liu hsing hsiang
Japanese jūroku gyōsō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

四弘誓願


四弘誓愿

see styles
Mandarin sì hóng shì yuàn / si4 hong2 shi4 yuan4
Taiwan ssu hung shih yüan
Japanese shi ku seigan
The four universal vows of a Buddha or bodhisattva: 衆生無邊誓願度 to save all living beings without limit; 煩惱無數誓願斷 to put an end to all passions and delusions however numerous; 法門無盡誓願學 to study and learn all methods and means without end; 佛道無上誓願成 to become perfect in the supreme Buddha-law. The four vows are considered as arising one by one out of the 四諦 Four Noble Truths; four great vows of bodhisattvahood

四種四諦


四种四谛

see styles
Mandarin sì zhǒng sì dì / si4 zhong3 si4 di4
Taiwan ssu chung ssu ti
Japanese sh ishu shitai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

四聖諦智


四圣谛智

see styles
Mandarin sì shèng dì zhì / si4 sheng4 di4 zhi4
Taiwan ssu sheng ti chih
Japanese shi shōtai chi
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

尼彌留陀


尼弥留陀

see styles
Mandarin ní mí liú tuó / ni2 mi2 liu2 tuo2
Taiwan ni mi liu t`o / ni mi liu to
Japanese nimiruda
nirodha, tr. as 滅 extinction, annihilation, cessation, the third of the four noble truths, cf. 尼樓陀; niruddha

有作四諦


有作四谛

see styles
Mandarin yǒu zuò sì dì / you3 zuo4 si4 di4
Taiwan yu tso ssu ti
Japanese usa shitai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淸淨法眼


淸净法眼

see styles
Mandarin qīng jìng fǎ yǎn / qing1 jing4 fa3 yan3
Taiwan ch`ing ching fa yen / ching ching fa yen
Japanese shōjō hōgen
The pure dharma-eye, with which the Hīnayāna disciple first discerns the four noble truths, and the: Mahāyāna disciple discerns the unreality of self and things.

無作四諦


无作四谛

see styles
Mandarin wú zuò sì dì / wu2 zuo4 si4 di4
Taiwan wu tso ssu ti
Japanese musa shitai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

無作聖諦


无作圣谛

see styles
Mandarin wú zuò shèng dì / wu2 zuo4 sheng4 di4
Taiwan wu tso sheng ti
Japanese musa shōtai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

現觀四諦


现观四谛

see styles
Mandarin xiàn guān sì dì / xian4 guan1 si4 di4
Taiwan hsien kuan ssu ti
Japanese genkan shitai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

苦集滅道


苦集灭道

see styles
Mandarin kǔ jí miè dào / ku3 ji2 mie4 dao4
Taiwan k`u chi mieh tao / ku chi mieh tao
Japanese kujuumetsudou;kujumetsudou;kushumetsudou / kujumetsudo;kujumetsudo;kushumetsudo / くじゅうめつどう;くじゅめつどう;くしゅめつどう
Chinese the Four Noble Truths (Budd.), namely: all life is suffering 苦, the cause of suffering is desire 集, emancipation comes only by eliminating passions 滅|灭, the way 道 to emancipation is the Eight-fold Noble Way 八正道; also called 四諦|四谛
Japanese {Buddh} (See 四諦) Suffering, Source of Suffering Desire, The Cessation of Suffering, The Way Leading to the Cessation of Suffering (The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism)
The four axioms or truths: i. e. duḥkha, pain; samudaya, as above; nirodha, the extinguishing of pain and reincarnation; mārga, the way to such extinction; cf. 四諦; suffering, origination, cessation, path

佛說四諦經


佛说四谛经

see styles
Mandarin fó shuō sì dì jīng / fo2 shuo1 si4 di4 jing1
Taiwan fo shuo ssu ti ching
Japanese Bussetsu shitai kyō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

未知當知根


未知当知根

see styles
Mandarin wèi zhī dāng zhī gēn / wei4 zhi1 dang1 zhi1 gen1
Taiwan wei chih tang chih ken
Japanese michi tōchi kon
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

無生四眞諦


无生四眞谛

see styles
Mandarin wú shēng sì zhēn dì / wu2 sheng1 si4 zhen1 di4
Taiwan wu sheng ssu chen ti
Japanese mushō shishintai
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition
This page contains 43 results for "4 noble truths" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

Just because a word appears here does not mean it is appropriate for a tattoo, your business name, etc. Please consult a professional before doing anything stupid with this data.

We do offer Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Services. We'll also be happy to help you translate something for other purposes.

No warranty as to the correctness, potential vulgarity, or clarity is expressed or implied. We did not write any of these definitions (though we occasionally act as a contributor/editor to the CC-CEDICT project). You are using this dictionary for free, and you get what you pay for.

The following titles are just to help people who are searching for an Asian dictionary to find this page.

Japanese Kanji Dictionary

Free Asian Dictionary

Chinese Kanji Dictionary

Chinese Words Dictionary

Chinese Language Dictionary

Japanese Chinese Dictionary